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which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republicans want to close tax loopholes and eliminate deductions, which they say will raise $800 billion in new revenue. >> the president has a huge responsibility to work together with congress and find a solution to avert the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: and they say it's now up to the president to find a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. so now that each side has rejected the other's first offer, it's going to be interesting and important to watch the timing of the next offer on the part of the white house t
contributions will go from 4.2% to 6.2%. that's $115 billion a year that would go to deficit reduction instead of being pumped into the economy. heidi sherholtz is an economist. >> it's less money for consumers to spend, that means that the demand for business services will drop, who provides goods and services, workers, so employment will fall. >> reporter: those in favor allowing the tax cuts to expire argue money for social security payments has to come from somewhere. although john says that somewhere will mean doing without some of the basics. >> might be a pair of sneakers. >> reporter: might be a jacket. might be those pair of boots that they want to go there and keep warm. >> for john the debate in washington is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> early this morning a tentative deal was reached to end the strike that shut down this nation's largest port complex. workers are expected to return to work this morning. clerks at the ports of los angeles and long beach, california had been on strike for eight days. the de
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2